Setting out for Ithaka

220px-Constantine_Cavafy,_ca_1900As you set out for Ithaka 

hope the voyage is a long one 

full of adventure, full of discovery. 

Constantine Petrou Cavafy (1863 – 1933)

Bath Writers & Artists’ fascinating journey is only just beginning, but what an adventure we are about to have!

This afternoon ( 27th May) at least six of us – VERONA BASS, AMA BOLTON, SARAH GREGORY, ANN PRESTON, TESSA STRICKLAND and me – were swept away in Bath Assembly Rooms by the vivacity and brilliance of Emily Wilson’s presentation of her new translation of The Odyssey which is inspiring our next meetup on 28th July. Already ideas for an afternoon paying homage to this greatest of all literary journeys are flowing in.  Cavafy, for example, (portrait above) whose marvellous Ithaka ( read by the right person ) is going to electrify the room. Margaret Atwood, Derek Walcot, Joseph Brodsky, Louise Gluck, Chaim Gouri, Carol Ann Duffy, Michael Longley….. I have already been offered mesmerising poems by all of these.  We will be using extracts from Emily Wilson’s book to provide a simple framework for the afternoon contributions – which means we need an authoritive and compelling voice or pair of voices to play the part of guiding narrative.

ALSO ON JULY 28TH…

AMA BOLTON is going to share her journey to St Kilda,

and VERONA BASS the journey she has made to create her two debut poetry pamphlets.

 

Malcolm Ashman Paintings in St Ives

Malcolm Ashman’s opening in St Ives

Meanwhile, in St Ives this very evening, MALCOLM ASHMAN RWA, RBA, ROI,  who recently joined the Bath Writers & Artists group,  is at the opening of his latest exhibition, which will feature some of his journeys as a painter to the heart of landscape. On a forthcoming meetup afternoon, we hope to present a slideshow of Malcolm’s landscape paintings, to mark and celebrate his joining of the group.

Friend of Bath Writers & Artists, PAT MILLNER, having very suitably been in Patmos during our last meetup, is hoping she might be able to make the long journey from Appledore to take part in our Odyssey afternoon.

And for journeys of the spirit, one of Bath Writers & Artists great adventurers, Sherborne singer/songwriter MIRANDA PENDER is allowing me to share this recent portrait. Miranda recently created a musical setting for William Henreysen’s final letter from Mexico, beginning with the words “I have been anointed for a journey”, which just might, therefore, find its tiny way into our afternoon.

 

Miranda Pender being Adventurous

Miranda Pender looking adventurous

As RS Thomas wrote, and that was only on one island….

And I haven’t yet sent out the message requesting contributions and contributors for July!

PLEASE GET IN TOUCH IF YOU HAVE IDEAS AND THOUGHTS TO SHARE ABOUT OUR ODYSSEY AFTERNOON, OR WOULD LIKE TO CONTRIBUTE BY READING / PERFORMING /SINGING SOME OF THE WORKS WE CHOOSE.

WE WILL WELCOME SHARED PRESENTATIONS & STORYTELLING AS WELL AS POETRY, AND WILL BE DELIGHTED TO BE OFFERED COMPACT TALKS, WITH SLIDES.

ANYTHING , REALLY, WHICH DELIGHTS THE GIVER, SPRINGS OFF SOME MOMENT IN HOMER’S ODYSSEY,  AND WHICH WILL ENTHRALL AND ENTERTAIN THE AUDIENCE…..

DRESS CODE : BLACK FEATHERS (see below)

John_William_Waterhouse_-_Ulysses_and_the_Sirens_(1891)

John William Waterhouse : Ulysses and the Sirens

 

NOTHING BUT HEADLINE ACTS….

Bath Writers & Artists Meetup 19th May

Yesterday’s meetup of the Bath Writers & Artists group was outstandingly successful and very well attended considering that we were competing with blissful weather, the FA Cup Final, multiple events in the Bath Festival and the Wedding of the Year.

With the dazzling exception of Claire Dyer’s book launch (more later about this) the meetup was devoted to poetry.  The morning workshop focussed on the meaning and uses of form in poetry while the afternoon readings offered a selection of pieces demonstrating how differently master practitioners have employed form in their work. 

The morning workshop participants brought in poems of their own, reconfigured word for word and repunctuated appropriately as prose. The task for everyone was to discover the ‘inner’ form which (visually) had been removed by this exercise. This task brought into discussion the huge question whether the form of a poem is from the outset indivisible from the content, or whether form is a vehicle for taking the first idea of a poem into a further, better place. Does form exist organically in each individual poem, or is it gathered in from the tradition, to enrich and augment the work? Is it the poet’s task to discover the form inside the poem it falls to him to write?  Or is it his task to fit his first thought into a form which pre-exists?  These are not of course ‘either’/‘or’ questions, though it is hard to tease them out without suggesting that they are. The idea of form, perhaps, is like the string on a musical instrument.  The poet and the poem must find the place on the string which will produce the note they want to play.

As it happened, our afternoon poets – chosen, eloquently introduced and beautifully read by Frances-Anne King, Shirley Wright, Claire Dyer, Ama Bolton, Harry Thurston, Margaret Heath and Roger Whelan – gave us a wonderful demonstration of the breadth of possible uses of form in poetry. At one end of the spectrum, we heard Elizabeth Bishop’s much liked villanelle, ‘The Art of Losing’, a famous  example of extreme formality. Intensely concerned with form, also, are the 150 poems in Michael Symmons Roberts’ collection Drysalter which was strongly presented at the start of the afternoon. It was interesting that the villanelle form could communicate itself so powerfully sight unseen, whereas Roberts’ chosen 15 line ‘constraint’ for Drysalter seemed not to have a strong aural existence, but to be more about appearance on the page. This was something we had encountered in the morning workshop when Louise Green’s ballad form poem refused to surrender its form when converted into prose, while Shirley Wright’s terza rima poem kept the secret of its formality until we saw the original poem on the page.

There is a contemporary interest in poetic form as a desirable discipline, or perhaps as a constraint to free the poet from what he or she might regard as the prison of the self.  Michael Symmons Roberts spoke about this at his Holburne Festival Reading later in the day, saying that he did not want to write ‘another Symmons Roberts’ poem’ and hoped that imposing formal constraints might help him to this end.

Conversely, poets sometimes want to subvert traditional forms to show that they are not trapped inside the constraints of history.  This might mean rejecting punctuation, something explored by Claire Dyer in her morning workshop speculum poem, and explored very differently, by W.S. Merwin, whose poems Ama Bolton presented in the afternoon.

The morning workshop had considered punctuation as an element of form – the way it works, with line and stanza breaks, to ‘score’ the poem for the reader, and, by showing a reader how the poem should be read, or delivered, to add to the clarity of what the poem has to say.  The absence of punctuation – visually so arresting but aurally undetectable – is a powerful formal possibility which a future workshop might explore another day.

The Pass on a Poet contributors gave us a marvellous feast of good poetry and I hope many of the pieces will be reviewed in the comments boxes below.  The three poems which remain most vividly with me this morning are Sue Sims’ poem from Hawthornden, George Mackay Brown’s poem about the falcon, and Kei Miller’s ‘Unsung’.  Sue’s poem held me because its subject was simple and powerful, its expression was disciplined and direct, it wasted no words, it knew exactly where to end and Sue has mastered the use of the microphone so that she can deliver her writing as it should be heard, giving her poem an apparently effortless journey from the writer to the listener’s heart. I don’t know whether the Holburne Museum hadn’t provided  microphones for Michael Symmons Roberts and his interviwer last night, or whether for some reason they had chosen not to use them, but the resulting loss of resonance, range  and expressivity throughout that event was quite striking. The poems were entirely audible, at least for me, but swallowed up and flattened out dismally by the space. There is probably a counter-argument that a festival audience likes the sense of privileged eavesdropping on a private conversation, but this is a rather tired formula now and personally I prefer poets to look on themselves as musical performers whose duty is to envelop their listeners in the magic of the sound and meaning produced by their chosen instrument, the human voice. I want to be spellbound (as I was earlier in the week by Ben Okri, and yesterday by Kei Miller) by every syllable. At £10 an hour for the Holburne ticket, that doesn’t seem too much to ask.

To return to the Duncan Room….

Screen Shot 2018-05-20 at 15.29.05Margaret Heath had chosen three pieces by George Mackay Brown.  I knew The Hawk already and already loved the fierce trajectory of its taut writing and the rigour of its form. I thought Margaret’s reading conveyed the poem’s formality and economy very well.

None of us will forget the last poem of the Pass on a Poet set.  It was Kei Miller’s ‘Unsung’, which we heard, for the first time, read by Kei Miller himself, thanks to a clip I was able to purchase from the internet. There he was, in a still image, above us on the screen while his immaculate voice surrounded us in the room.  (If I had been more technically courageous, we could have had a clip of the live reading.  I am still floundering a bit with the move from my Mac to the Duncan Room’s PC.)  Roger Whelan was then generous enough to give us a live reading of the same piece and to let us share the powerful effect the poem had on him. ‘Unsung’ is a poem calling out to be read – and we were fortunate enough to have a reader knowing how to use the resources of the voice and microphone to deliver what the poet meant to say while also making the piece utterly his own. I hope we will all learn to read to each other as well as Roger Whelan does.

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If nothing more had happened in our meetup, it would already have been an outstanding day. But we had four more terrific experiences in store.  A truly excellent tea, provided by the Writers & Artists – too generous, as usual, but sumptuous to share.  Sue Sims then gave us a rivetting take on her experiences at Hawthornden Castle, speaking with great poise and accomplishment to her specially created slides. Thanks to Sue’s energy and professionalism, we were right there, at Hawthornden. This was a marvellous example of how good it has been for us to make the expensive move to the technically equipped BRLSI.  Sue and Paul’s presentation of their son Mark’s memoir was one of the highlights of the March meetup. It was a great treat for us that Sue was willing to offer us another illustrated talk.

Finally, our two star launches, with Claire Dyer not only reading from The Last Day, but taking us on a really fascinating journey through the process of successive drafts and giving us insight into the roles of agent and editor.  Claire will be speaking again at the Waterstone’s event on Thursday 24th May in Reading Library – an evening, for anyone within reach of Reading, which should certainly not be missed. We returned to poetry with Shirley Wright’s presentation of her latest collection, Sticks and Stones.  Beautifully structured, beautifully paced, these poems manage to be intricate and powerful, formal yet organically alive, and Shirley’s reading, as always, had tremendous power, conviction, variety and grace.  I hope some audience members will add reviews of our two launch books in the comments box, or mail me appreciations to augment to this post.

Thank you so much to yesterday’s contributors and to the attentive and sympathetic audience members whose presence made the afternoon so special for us all.  Your comments will also be extremely welcome and I will be delighted to add them to this post.

Our next meetup is at the end of July when we will explore the theme of journeys with a particular inclination towards the travels of Odysseus.  RWA artist Malcolm Ashman has just become a Friend of the Bath Writers & Artists group and we will open our July session with an introduction to Malcolm’s landscape paintings ( on slide ) and a homage reading from the Bath Poetry Cafe’s own great journey, The Listening Walk, for which Malcolm provided the cover image, so well loved by us all. I have already received a few other fascinating Homeric suggestions, including one from Lesley Saunders,  and I am eager to have more.   Graphics will be hugely welcome. I think we may already have an exciting offer from Larkhall artist  Jude Wisdom, if her forthcoming exhibition at Chapel Arts leaves her time to share her journey thoughts with us. I am also hoping that Nikki Kenna will be home from her art course in Newlyn in time to contribute to the show.  We will need good readers and this is an advance warning to them both that I am hoping to coax in Margaret Heath and Roger Whelan from among our Friends.  I will send a begging message to everyone very soon. In the meantime, do get to the Emily Wilson Odyssey reading in the Bath Assembly Rooms on Saturday 26th May if you can. ( And, unlike the Holburne Museum, let’s hope the Assembly Rooms provide a microphone.)

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For those of you who couldn’t join us yesterday, I will post the Pass on a Poet programme notes up on the blog, with a few of the slides, so you can share at least some of the afternoon. I will also ask the readers to send me the titles of their contributions so that we can all revisit them.

And to the well-behaved dog who didn’t materialise….a kindly greeting and a hope we might meet you and your carer in July. As everyone knows, a poetry event without a well-behaved dog is like a well behaved fish without a bicycle.

Please comment on this post, either directly, or by sending me in your thoughts, which I be pleased to post.

Upcoming BW&A meetup 19th May

All the details seem to be in place now for the second meetup of the Bath Writers & Artists Group.  We will be in the Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution in Queen Square all day on Saturday 19th May. The morning workshop subscribers have a gruelling few hours probing rather deeply into poetic form.  Afternoon guests have a wonderful range of readings and book launches, combined ( we hope ) with a delicious brought-in tea.  Sue Sims also plans to tell us about her month at Hawthornden.

The new ‘Pass on a Poet’ feature has already proved extremely popular with friends and subscribers and now has a Page of its own on this blog. Thanks to Ama Bolton, Harry Thurston, Conor Whelan, Claire Dyer and Margaret Heath,  the May meetup will showcase the work of Elizabeth Bishop, Kei Miller,

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Kei Miller

WS Merwin, George Mackay Brown and Helen Dunmore, with a very special appreciation by Frances-Anne King and Shirley Wright of Forward Collection prizewinner Michael Symmons Roberts who will be guest reading for Bath Festival at the Holburne Museum later in the day.

Do look at the excellent new entries on the blog ( and some not so new, but not flagged up before in one of these posts) .

VERONA BASS has updated us on her progress towards a second pamphlet. CLAIRE COLEMAN has written very eloquently about her ongoing work with the Memory Café Project.  Since we have CLAIRE DYER‘S book launch at the end of the afternoon, it is fascinating to revisit her entries on the Project 2017 blog. SARAH GREGORY has updated her Page and included a wonderful image from her recent visit to Myanmar. MICHAEL LOVEDAY‘S update introduces us to his recently published flash-fiction novella, Three Men on the Edge, which he will be launching with Bath Writers & Artists in October this year.  Those of us who were bowled over by MIRANDA PENDER‘S

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Miranda Pender

performance at the Letters from Mexico Larkhall launch in March will love her  Page entry which introduces the songs on her new CD Lifting the Lid.  And, shamed by all these, I am at last about to update my own Page, which always seems to come second, third or ninth to other things.

That leaves more than a few subscribers whose Pages are a little more dormant than the rest of us would like!

I have been encouraging members of the afternoon audience who contribute to events to join our Friends & Associates Page. Rosie Jackson has already sent me a biography for this ,which I will be posting up very soon, and I will be very pleased to hear from other people who want to identify themselves as active supporters of our group.

And here, to end, is a picture from our Almanac which says that it’s May again in Kipling Avenue……

March frog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meetup Report Saturday 24th March

Enthusiastic messages are already flying in about the Bath Writers & Artists inaugural afternoon meetup in the Duncan Room. ( I have reported on the Morning Workshop on this separate linked Page. ) Our special guests, Chair of Bath and North East Somerset Council, Councillor Cherry  Beath, and Betty Suchar, Chair of Management of the Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution arrived with admirable precision exactly on 2pm to the already packed Duncan Room and from that moment, we were non-stop energy and activity until 5.15pm. This photograph by Keynsham photographer Matt Prosser shows Chair of Bath and North East Somerset Council, Councillor Cherry Beath, with Taunton writer and director, Graeme Ryan who lead the group performance of Building the Kelston Barn.Chair Cherry Beath & Director Graeme Ryan

 

After the Book Table readings, which will be a regular feature of the meetups this year, Tessa Strickland, William Heath and Matt Prosser gave a compelling overview of the iconic local arts space Kelston Barn.  Matt’s presentation of his printed Passport-Tessa-Stricklandphotographs, individual slides and very atmospheric slideshow, as well as being so compelling in themselves,  really brought home to us the possibilities of being able to meet in a building which offers us these technical facilities.  Matt’s links are on this blog, and his Kelston photographs will be appearing in later posts once I have explored his Dropbox link.  It is a blessing for those of us who need occasional publicity photographs to have met and spent time with such a congenial and relaxed photographer.    Matt was also on hand to photograph the Chair of the Council for us, which will be warmly welcomed by Bath and North East Somerset Council who are already such kindly supporters of our new group.

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Matt Prosser who took the March 24th photographs on this post

Having expanded our official title to include photography, we next saw it expand again, to embrace the vocal talents of Andrew Lawrence and Phil Shepherd, who had mastered Patrick Kavanagh’s Raglan Road at very short notice to bring melody into our afternoon. Time confined their performance to two verses, but I am hoping to persuade them to return on one of the afternoons when singer/songwriter  Miranda Pender is up from Sherborne, so that song can play a larger part in that particular afternoon.  Andrew Lawrence has been offering his many skills and talents to the World War One programmes for several years.  It was a great addition to our meetup that he was willing to share them so generously with our new group.

‘Building the Kelston Barn’, the collaborative poem which arose from last September’s Bathscape workshop, became, under Taunton poet Graeme Ryan’s confident direction, an extraordinary performance experience involving the whole room. I hope some of the people who shared this truly remarkable event will write something of their own in the comments box below this post.

These two photographs by Keynsham photographer Matt Prosser show the Bath Writers & Artists working with director Graeme Ryan on the first ever group performance of Building the Kelston Barn.

 

Building the Kelston Barn 1Building the Kelston Barn 2

 Sue, Chris and Dave Sims’ moving tribute to Dr Mark Sims closed our afternoon.  As with the Kelston Barn presentation

Scan copy it was wonderful to have the facilities to follow Mark’s story through photographs and film. His was an inspiring life and we were all deeply moved that the family shared so much of their journey and so many of their memories and were able to bring us so closely into their circle of love, and grief, and loss.

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Chair Cherry Beath & Writer Rosie JacksonAs well as the morning workshop participants, and the people mentioned above, it was a great pleasure to share this afternoon with  Sara Butler, Claire Coleman, Beverley Ferguson, Brian Goodsell, Dawn Gorman, Margaret Heath, Caroline Heaton, Rosie Jackson, Michael Loveday, Ruth Marden, Phil Shepherd, Conor Whelan, Jude and Florrie Wisdom, and all the other friends of our new project who came to join us for this inaugural meeting in the Duncan Room.        This photograph by Keynsham photographer shows Councillor Cherry Beath with Frome writer Rosie Jackson who was one of the original contributors to Building the Kelston Barn.

 

 

First Meetup of the Year

The new Bath Writers & Artists Group is now fully subscribed with its full 2018 schedule of meetings booked at the Bath Literary and Scientific Institution in Queen Square, Bath.

The afternoon events are FREE  and OPEN TO ALL.  We will be delighted to welcome the many writers who have shared Writing Days with us in the past, but equally pleased to welcome new writers and artists to our afternoon audience.

SATURDAY 24TH MARCH 1.45pm – 5pm

(Find fuller details by clicking here to the linked page….)

We are very honoured that our inaugural meeting will be attended by the Chair of Bath and North East Somerset Council, Councillor Cherry Beath.  The afternoon will include readings by Verona Bass, Sue Boyle, Claire Dyer, Linda Saunders, Harry Thurston and Shirley Wright.

We are also very fortunate that William Heath and Tessa Strickland will be presenting a special sequence of photographs to capture the magic of William Heath’s Kelston Barn, where 26 of us worked together last autumn to produce the collaborative performance piece, Building the Kelston Barn.

Experienced stage director Graeme Ryan from Taunton is going to lead us in a  performance ‘from scratch’ of this remarkable and moving piece.

The last part of the afternoon is dedicated to Doctor Mark Sims, whose memoir P.S. I have Cancer launches in Bath with us.  This remarkable book, described by author Danny Wallace as “brave and sobering, funny and inspiring” holds a very special place in our affections.  Mark’s mother, poet Sue Sims, is a long-standing member of the Bath Cafe Writing Days group, and Mark himself was able to join us to hear Sue’s powerful reading during Other Lives, Readings from the Chairman’s Writing Days which Sara-Jane Arbury,  Heidi Beck, Stephanie Boxall,  Claire Coleman,  Annie Fisher,  Ray Fussell,  Rick Rycroft & Shirley Wright presented in the Elwin Room on 7th March 2015.

 

 

 

 

Craft or sullen art?

ways with words in the city of Wells

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The word “sea” is small and easily uttered.
They utter it lightly who know least about it.
A vast ancient terror is locked in the name
like energy in an atom.
– George Mackay Brown, The Sea.

In spite of lashings of wind and rain, we met last night, 6th January, with Sara in the chair. As at previous January meetings, most people brought poems by other people. It was a lively and interesting evening.

Where I could find them, I have added links to the particular poems. Seamus Heaney, Dylan Thomas  and John Betjeman are reading their own poems, and the Billy Collins link is to a particularly charming animation. Each one is well worth reading/listening to, if you have the time!

Wales was represented by R.S. Thomas, Dylan Thomas and Gillian Clarke,  Ireland by Greg Delanty and Seamus Heaney, Scotland by Robert Burns, W.S. Graham

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