Saturday 21st September 2019

Morning MURCH ROOM
Afternoon DUNCAN ROOM
£165.60 paid

Murch Morning  : ALI BACON, VERONA BASS, AMA BOLTON , SUE BOYLE, EILEEN CAMERON, MARILYN FRANCIS, MARGARET HEATH , ANDREW LAWRENCE, ANN PRESTON , JUNE WENTLAND (10)

Duncan Afternoon : ALI BACON, VERONA BASS , AMA BOLTON , SUE BOYLE, EILEEN CAMERON, ANN CULLIS , MARILYN FRANCIS , MARGARET HEATH  , ANDREW LAWRENCE, MIRANDA PENDER , ANN PRESTON, JUNE WENTLAND (12)

 

Trial Poster for September 21st

MEETUP DAY DESIGNED AND CO-HOSTED

BY MARILYN FRANCIS, JUNE WENTLAND & SUE BOYLE

The morning meeting in the Murch Room will be a workshop session focussing on fine-tuning submissions for competitions and magazines.  The most popular submissions from subscribers will feature in the concert of readings in the afternoon. Afternoon submissions are invited from all members of Bath Writers & Artists group – poetry, prose, memoir, novel extracts, flash fiction, songs, written by yourself or by another.

AFTERNOON PROGRAMME 

Joan Baez reads James Joyce
Presented by MARILYN FRANCIS

images-1

Joan Baez

Fern Hill by Dylan Thomas
Read by  VERONA BASS, AMA BOLTON, ANDREW LAWRENCE and MIRANDA PENDER

 

images

Dylan Thomas

 

Three ‘prize’ pieces from the morning workshop chosen and presented by SUE BOYLE, MARILYN FRANCIS, and JUNE WENTLAND

Swings and Roundabouts . MARILYN FRANCIS presents the anthology of poems about childhood which she created recently with other members of her Arvon group.

Writing Childhood.  Concert curated by JUNE WENTLAND.

VERONA BASS Extract from Olive Schreiner’s The Story of an African Farm
ANN CULLIS Poems by Vernon Scanell and Edward Lucie-Smith
MARGARET HEATH It Is What It Is  by Paul Muldoon
MIRANDA PENDER What Happened in Hastings ( song)

TEA

Writing to JUDE WISDOM’S exhibition images. See below. Curated by SUE BOYLE

TWO NONSENSE POEMS read by MARILYN FRANCIS and JUNE WENTLAND

FLASH MOB SURPRISE by the Performance Practice Group

 

END

 

 

 

 

SIX JUDE WISDOM IMAGES FOR THE WRITING CHALLENGE

Version 3

Elephant and Moon

Version 2

Monkey with a Lute

Lion and Little Creature

Lion and Beetle

Version 3

Girl and Cockerel

The Breton sailor boy
Ama Bolton

Guirec, youngest of eight
grew up on an island
at the edge of the world
a wild child

spent more time in boats
than on land
more time at sea
than at school

left with no certificates
and a hunger for adventure
took any work he could find
slept on the streets

bought a boat and sailed
five years through storm and calm
through heat and frost
round the world and back

his only companion
Monique from Tenerife
faithful Monique
the Rhode Island Red

The Hen Who Sailed Around the World by Guirec Soudeé is published by Little, Brown

 

Les Betes Sauvages
Marilyn Francis

Gather gopher wood and await instructions.
Do not ask what gopher wood is.

You must build something
300 by 50 by 30 cubits.

Do not ask what a cubit is.
Await instructions, and in the meantime

take an inventory of the zoological gardens.
Construct an aviary.

You will need a raven and a dove.
Do not say it’s only a shower.

Await instructions.
Do not ask questions.

Version 3

Angel

Version 2

Child with Warthogs

 

I dream of animals
Ama Bolton

a horse that would fly
if only I could salve his wounds
and braid a bridle from the brittle stalks
of last year’s nettles

a goat who gives advice
a wolf who shows the way
a fox who offers food
and protection

a bird that brings news
flicking up its chequered crest
to warn of danger
or to lead me into it

 

MARILYN FRANCIS WRITES.….

If there’s one thing we can be certain of, it is that we were all children once upon a time. Though it may not always have been a happy time. That child is part of who we are today. We are that child. 

There are many well-known poems and passages of prose, fiction and memoir as well as songs about childhood that might fire the imagination or simply be enjoyed for themselves. For instance: Dylan Thomas’s ‘Fern Hill’, the first passage from chapter one of James Joyce’s Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, the first paragraph of David Copperfield, and the beginning of J D Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye, ‘… all that David Copperfield kind of crap’. Anyway, I do hope you’ll agree that childhood is a fruitful topic for our mutual exploration. At the top of this Page is a splendid interpretation by Joan Baez of the Joyce piece.

Last year some friends and I got together to produce a pamphlet of poems (and photographs) about our own childhoods, swings & roundabouts. It was a lot of fun to do, maybe that’s because it’s a subject we all know plenty about. So, for the morning session on 21st September we are looking for contributions, poetry or prose, on the theme of childhood. The most admired three pieces will be read as part of the afternoon performances.

museum-of-childhood

Museum of Childhood